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Book Review Books

Book review: City of Bones & City of Ashes

Now, I know these are old books, an old series but I have started reading this 6-book series this year, so I’m writing about them now.

City of Bones is the first part of The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare and is the book enchanting or what. I started reading it because I had to reduce he size of my one-year-old TBR list and this one called to me. Once I started, I had to finish it at he earliest and move to the next part.

Clarissa or Clary is an average American teenage girl who has a fairly simple life. Going to school, going out with friends and defying her mom. She has never known her father but she has a father-figure in her life, Luke. All this changes one day when she meets a handsome and attractive boy, Jace and his friends Alec and Isabelle.

Soon after, Clary’s mother disappears and she is sucked into a world that she didn’t even know existed. She meets Shadowhunters, demons, werewolves, vampires and warlocks. In her pursuit to find her mother, she comes across many truths that were hidden from her and also falls in love with Jace.

At the end of the first part, Clary finds her mother but she is in a coma-like state and no medicine shows any effect on her. Clary also learns some shocking truth about herself and Jace which changes the dynamics of her blossoming relationship with Jace completely.

Part two of the series, City of Ashes carries on with Clary’s search for a cure for her mother and also her struggles with the reality of the life that was hidden from her so far. They are all under serious threat from Valentine, the great villain, as he is gaining more power with each passing day.

Talking of the characters, Clary is a likeable teenager who is suddenly thrust into the unknown with no clue of who to trust and how to protect herself. Jace is fearless warrior who comes across as arrogant at first but is quite charming when he wants to be. Simon, Clary’s best friend is a normal human boy who likes her and keeps trying to tell her this. His character shows the maximum change and is a delight to read.

I found Cassandra Clare’s writing fast and interesting. I am partial towards fantasy books and this series has delivered it for me. The first two parts are good, fast and with enough plot twists to keep you hooked. From first page to the last, I was completely engrossed and as soon as I finished the first part, I wanted to move to the next. There are four more to go in the series and I have no idea how the story will pan out ahead, but the beginning of the saga is promising enough.

My rating: 4.5/5 for City of Bones

4.5/5 for City of Ashes

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Book Review Books

Book Review: Children of Blood and Bone

Sometimes I just love myself for the fact that I love reading! OK, so this book is not all that great or a literary genius but its good and fast and the girls take charge in a world where men make all the rules. Children of Blood and Bone is about Zelie, a diviner (one with magical blood) and Amari, the princess of Orisha who team up along with Tzain, Zelie’s brother to bring back magic to Orisha and bring down King Saran’s terrorising reign. When Amari sees the scroll that has the power to reawaken magic, she runs away with it from the royal castle and Zelie, without realising who she is, helps her escape.

Zelie and Amari have been chosen by the Gods to finish the quest to bring back magic and they start on this journey, albeit hesitantly and distrustful of each other. King Saran wants to keep magic dead and he would do anything to enure this. His son, Inan is on his side working hard to impress his father and be the future king that his father wishes him to be. What he soon realises though is that he too has magic in his blood which is reawakened when he accidentally touches the magic scroll while chasing Zelie and Amari.

Tomi Adeyemi’s debut novel is full of magic, even her words are magically woven. The love of siblings, struggle of a young girl who has seen her mother being tortured and hanged as an example, a brother’s struggle to keep his younger sister safe; another brother trying to capture his sister to impress his tyrranical father and a young princess who finds in herself the power to stand up against her father and runs away to help the diviners.

Of all the characters, Inan is probably the one who drew the short straw on life’s struggles because he is in the most unfathomable position of all. Trying to fit into his father’s very large expectations, he tries to bottle up his magic so he can be the son and prince that his father wants him to be.

The magical world is nicely woven, the feelings are too real and emotions are brilliantly depicted. With three teenagers having been thrust a task too daunting for them, the emotions are running high and mistakes are made. And it is Tomi Adeyemi’s amazing word-play that brings it all to life. I enjoyed reading this book a lot and I am hopeful that the second part will be just as good.

My rating: 4.8/5

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Book Review Books

Book Review: Turtles All The Way Down

Aza has a problem that even therapy is not able to solve.

Davis has a lot of money and a missing father.

And no, this is not their love story.

Turtles All The Way Down is more about friendship than love. The focus is on Aza, her obsession towards infection and the effect of this obsession on her friendship with her best friend Daisy and her new-found love with Davis. Aza is so caught up in her spiral that she zones out of conversations. This is Aza’s narrative and she is not in the best of mental health. Her problem is not something she can snap out of, she lives and struggles with it every moment of her life.

John Green has tackled the matter of mental illness in a teenager brilliantly. Rarely do we see authors give such a complication to their main character and she shines. She is not the shining star of her school and she knows she is ill, she is going through counselling for this and yet, she can’t control her urges. But, she manages it all and even digs into the disappearance of Davis’s father.

Another high point of the story is Aza and Daisy’s friendship. They have been together almost all their lives and even though Daisy knows Aza has some issues, it is much later in the story that she understands everything that Aza goes through.

I liked this book because it shows how your own thoughts can strangle you as if you are stuck in a spiral. And John Green puts it aptly when he says “The thing about spiral is, if you follow it inward, it never actually ends. It just keeps tightening, infinitely”.

After The Fault in Our Stars, I was quite eager to read this book and I am not disappointed. Turtles All the Way Down does not have the same impact as the earlier book but it is enjoyable till the end. John Green’s characters are good and he has given depth to them and he keeps away from stereotypical ending. The book also has a good number of quotes and metaphors to impress everyone.

My rating: 3.5/5